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What Are the Benefits of Installing a Reverse Osmosis Water System?

Imagine waking up to a refreshing glass of water that tastes crisp and clean–no more struggling to stay hydrated because your water is finally enjoyable to drink. This could be your reality with a reverse osmosis water system. But fresh water is not the only reason you should install a RO system in your home today. Here are more reasons to consider.

They Help Remove Impurities From Your Water

Perhaps the most obvious benefit of installing a reverse osmosis water system is that it can remove impurities from your water. RO systems are designed to filter out a variety of impurities, including minerals and chemicals. This is important because minerals and chemicals can have a number of harmful effects on your health. For example, too much iron in your water can lead to nausea and stomach problems, while too much calcium can cause kidney stones.

In addition, RO systems also help eliminate harmful bacteria and viruses, which cause serious illnesses, such as gastrointestinal diseases.

Better Tasting Water, Food

Another benefit of installing a RO water system is that you’ll enjoy better-tasting water. This is because the system filters out impurities, leaving you with pure, fresh-tasting water. What’s more, when your family members have access to clean, delicious-tasting water, they’re more likely to drink more of it.

Furthermore, when you use filtered water to cook or prepare drinks, the end result will be noticeably tastier than if you had used unfiltered water. Additionally, because filtered water is free of contaminants, it can help extend the shelf life of your food by preventing spoilage and bacteria growth.

Reduced Plumbing Problems

RO systems filter water at the molecular level, removing impurities that can cause plumbing problems.

Longer Lasting Appliances

Because RO systems remove impurities from your water, they also help extend the life of your kitchen appliances by preventing scale build-up.

More Benefits:

  • They can save you money by reducing the need for bottled water
  • They provide clean water on demand
  • Filtered water equals crystal clear ice cubes

Reach Out To Ising’s Culligan Water

Are you interested in reaping all the benefits of a reverse osmosis water system? Then contact Ising’s Culligan Water today. We offer high-quality RO systems that are designed to meet your specific needs. Our team of experts will help you choose the right system for your home and budget, and we’ll even handle the installation process for you. Fill out the online contact form OR call Ising’s Culligan Water today at 925-447-3717!

Related Articles:
What Are The Benefits of A Culligan Reverse Osmosis System?
How to Change the Filters on Culligan’s AC30 Reverse Osmosis Drinking Water System
How to change filters in Culligan’s Aqua Cleer Reverse Osmosis System
What Does Reverse Osmosis Remove From Drinking Water?
What Should I Look For When Buying A Reverse Osmosis System?

What Are The Benefits of A Culligan Reverse Osmosis System?

Hi, I’m Jay with Ising’s Culligan Water, and I’m back today to speak with you about the benefits of a reverse osmosis.

Plain and simple, reverse osmosis contain fewer contaminants, no parasites, and no bacteria. Reverse osmosis systems are composed of multiple filters, typically a carbon, a sediment, followed by a membrane, and lastly, some sort of post filter. In Ising’s Culligan and Culligan Water ROs, that is a post-carbon filter. The carbon filter is a filter that is specific for removing the taste and odor out of the water. The sediment is exactly what it says, for sediment and debris. The membrane is what is responsible to remove all contaminants and minerals, block solids, and prominent microbes passing through in the water itself.

There are multiple health factors that relate to drinking reverse osmosis water. For instance, ROs remove calcium. Calcium deposits can affect our skin in a negative manner. RO water also removes compounds such as phosphates, leads, arsenic, fluoride, cyanide, ammonia, and chloride. These problems contribute to organ complication, eye problems, and reproductive issues. ROs can also filter out parasites in the form of Cryptosporidium and Giardia. Cryptosporidium affects our small intestines. Giardia affects our GI tracts. Some of the effects we see from these are cramps, fever, and diarrhea. Giardia though can even equate to death in small children if left untreated. It has been said that RO water is even better for cancer patients to drink. At most times, cancer patients, specifically those undergoing radiation therapy, already have a broke down immune system. Broken down immune systems can lead to several health issues, so drinking RO water does not contain anything harmful in it, and would be a safer option for cancer patients.

The FDA does have regulations that cover all municipalities in regards to mineral and compound content that comprises the water. The minerals and compounds cannot exceed certain levels in every drinking water composition. The FDA actually recommends that lead have no presence in drinking water at all. A presence of lead in the drinking water can actually lead to nerve and muscle damage, brain damage, developmental issues, blood pressure issues, and fertility issues.

I hope you found this video useful today and some of the health benefits revolving around reverse osmosis systems. If you found this helpful or if you have any other questions, please contact us directly at 925-447-3717 or leave a comment below. If you liked this video and want to receive releases of our new videos, please don’t forget to hit the Subscribe button below. Thank you, and see you next video.

How to Change the Filters on Culligan’s AC30 Reverse Osmosis Drinking Water System

Hi, I’m Bill with Ising’s Culligan Water. In today’s video, we’re going to demonstrate how to change the filters on an AC30 reverse osmosis drinking water system.

There are basically three filters on an AC30. There is a pre-filter, and then there are a carbon filter, two types. One is a GAC, which is normally used for wells. The other is a carbon block, it’s what we normally use for city water. Then there is a post-carbon filter, which goes in after you’ve changed the filters on the housing. The housing is usually mounted up on a bracket. You need to pull it up off the bracket. After you’ve turn off the supply line, simple quarter turn will shut it off, trace a quarter-inch tubing from the inlet side, which is right here, to a valve. It should be very similar to this one. Turn it off, make sure it’s pointing down or up, depending on the orientation, and then shut off your holding tank, quarter turn will shut it off as well. Once that’s done, after you’ve taken it off the bracket, what you wanna do is look at the back, they are labeled one, two, three.

Number three has the membrane in it. The only time that ever needs to be changed is if the TDS, which stands for total dissolved solids, is too high. So what you have to do is you have to pull these clips out. After all the water is turned off and the holding tank is turned off, open your faucet, bleed the pressure, insert a screwdriver, or as I do, I use a clip. Pull the clip out, wiggle it down, and you’ll see the filter. Put your fingers right there, it’ll drop right out, take it, drop it into your sink. Put the new filter in it and put it back into place. Very simple. Only do one filter at a time because you can forget which place the housings go to. As I said, they’re labeled one, two, and three. The difference is the housings at position one and two do not have a plug. If you put one of those here, it will leak all over the place. Water will run out constantly. So you always wanna make sure you do them one at a time.

And there again, the same thing with the carbon filter. Put your clip on it, screwdriver, simply pry it out. The best way to take them off, forward, down, drop it into the housing, and then dump it into your sink. If there’s any build-up or any discoloration on the inside of it, it’s not to worry, it happens. If you want to, what you can do is, little soapy water, bottle brush. Do them one at a time. Rinse it out, put it back on, and that’s it. That’s all there is to the filter change. The carbon post-filter, and of course, it wants a B. The carbon post-filter is here. It’s usually sitting next to the unit on the other side of it, top of it, sometimes even on the bottom. It’s simple, a polish filter. What it does, it removes any additional odors or tastes that may come through the unit that it doesn’t normally go in. There is an arrow showing flow rate. What you do is push in on the tubing, hold the ring, pull out the tubing, install your new one. Turn on your water supply, make sure there are no leaks, turn on your holding tank, open up your faucet, let the water run. That’s all there is to a filter change.

I hope you found this video helpful. If you have any follow-up questions, please leave them below or give us a call at 925-447-3717. If you liked this video and want to know when we release new videos, don’t forget to hit Subscribe. Thank you and see you in the next video.

How to change filters in Culligan’s Aqua Cleer Reverse Osmosis System

Hi, I’m Bill with Ising’s Culligan Water. In today’s video, we’re going to demonstrate how to change the filters in Culligan’s Aqua-Cleer Reverse Osmosis drinking water system.

First thing we’re going to do is shut off the holding tank. Simple quarter turn of the top valve will shut off the holding tank. Next thing you want to look for underneath there is a quarter-inch tube, goes into a valving system very similar to this, which is the supply line. You want to make sure your supply line is off. It will be across the tubing. If it’s in line with the tubing, it will not work. It will continue to produce water to this system, which could provide additional pressure and a leak. Once those are off, you turn on your faucet to bleed the pressure off. Once that’s done, it’s a simple matter to wrap the filter, twist, pull down, pull up. Take a new filter of the same type. Always make sure you do one filter at a time, do not get in a hurry. If you notice, on the top, there are two little posts with O-rings. They will only fit in one way, and then what you do is turn them, quarter turn. You will feel it snap into place. Once it snaps into place, it’s good.

And then you want to proceed to the next one. You always do them one at a time. Do not strip them all out at one time because you can put them accidentally in the wrong sequence, which can prevent the unit from not working. Quarter turn, there again, put the filter back up, quarter turn, and that’s it. Now, the additional filters would go in the fourth spot. Those filters, if you do not have them already, there will be a plug there. Plug, you take out the same way. They have the same type of top, but what it does, it’s just simply a bypass cartridge. Take it, put it back. Once all of that is done, you turn on your valve, then you open up the holding tank. Turn your faucet on and let it start producing water. If you have had to change your membrane, which is the third one, you want it to let it drip for at least 30 minutes to an hour into the sink. Once that’s done, turn the system back off and you’re going to be installing your post-filter.

It is on a little clip, usually next to the unit, and to change it, there is a ring on this. You push the tubing in, you hold the ring down, you pull the tubing out. Very simple, easy to do. Put the new one in, there is an arrow to show flow rate. Flow rate will always go towards the rounded end. The back is different. Always follow the arrow, make sure you do not install it backwards because it could clog up the filter. Once that’s done, if you’ve changed the membrane, once it’s dripped for about an hour, turn your system off, and it should pressurize your tank.

I hope you found this video helpful. If you have any follow-up questions, please leave them below or give us a call at 925-447-3717. If you liked this video and want to know when we release new videos, don’t forget to hit Subscribe. Thank you and see you in the next video.

What are the different filters in the Culligan Aqua-Cleer Reverse Osmosis System?

Hi, my name is Bill with Ising’s Culligan Water. In today’s video, we’re going to discuss the differences in filters for the Aqua-Cleer reverse osmosis system.

The Aqua-Cleer reverse osmosis system initially comes with two filters, a membrane and a polishing filter. The first filter is a 5-micron sediment filter. What it does is it removes any sediment down to five microns before it goes into the next filter, which is a carbon block filter. This filter removes chlorine, odor and taste and certain other contaminants. There is also, besides a carbon block, a GAC filter for it, which removes additional contaminants, usually on wells or problem water. The third piece here is the membrane. These two filters are designed to protect the membrane from contaminates. What the membrane does is, as the incoming water comes in, it separates it. It sends all the garbage it pulls out of the water down the drain, sends all the good water into a holding tank. Also, on the system, there is additional cartridges you can put in. One of them is a Total Defense Cartridge. A Total Defense Cartridge goes in after the membrane, and what it does is it filters and separates possibly more contaminants from the water out before it goes into the holding tank.

Also, due to the fact that a reverse osmosis system will remove a lot of minerals, the Mineral Boost cartridge is designed to add beneficial minerals back into the water, due to the fact that the reverse osmosis membrane removes 95% of the minerals out of the water.

I hope you found this video helpful. If you have any follow-up questions, please leave them below or give us a call at 925-447-3717. If you like this video and want to know when we release new videos, don’t forget to hit subscribe. Thank you and see you in the next video.

What Does Reverse Osmosis Remove From Drinking Water?

Interested in a reverse osmosis system from Ising’s Culligan water? Not sure if it’s worth the investment, or what a reverse osmosis system actually removes from your water supply? Find out now!

How Does Reverse Osmosis (RO) Work?

Reverse osmosis, or RO for short, is a popular method of water purification because it’s very simple, straightforward, and easy to understand.

Basically, RO works by using high water pressure to force your tap water through a very dense, semipermeable membrane. The pores in this membrane are very small, ranging from 0.1 to 5,000 nm.

As the water is forced through this membrane, solid contaminants like salts, heavy metals, and others are left behind, but the water molecules are able to pass through the membrane. Then, the solids are drained away from the filter, while the water is sent through your taps.

Depending on your needs and budget, RO systems vary widely in size and type. Small, under-sink units can be used to purify a single tap, a unit can be installed to filter water for a few different taps and plumbing appliances, or you can install a whole-home residential unit that filters all of the water that enters your home.

What Does Reverse Osmosis Remove From My Water?

RO filtration typically removes up to 99% of all dissolved salts, metals, organic materials, bacteria, and other contaminants from your water. A few of the common substances that are filtered out of your tap water using reverse osmosis include:

  • Sodium
  • Chloride
  • Copper
  • Chromium
  • Lead
  • Protozoa such as cryptosporidium
  • Viruses including e. Coli
  • Bacteria such as salmonella

In addition, reverse osmosis can reduce the amount of other smaller, harder-to-remove contaminants like arsenic, calcium, potassium, magnesium, and phosphorus, to name a few. You can learn more from the CDC here.

If you are worried that your water is contaminated, or you simply want to use clean, pure water to cook, drink, and more, an RO system may be a great choice for you and your family.

Learn More About Reverse Osmosis Systems From Ising’s Culligan Water

At Ising’s Culligan Water, we’re experts in water filtration and treatment, and we have a wide variety of reverse osmosis products. If you’d like to learn more about reverse osmosis and its benefits and see if Reverse Osmosis filtration is right for your home, just contact us online or give us a call at 925-206-3727.

What Should I Look For When Buying A Reverse Osmosis System

If you want to ensure that you’re always getting pure, high-quality water in your home, a reverse osmosis (RO) system is a great investment. But it can be hard to understand how to choose a great reverse osmosis system for your household. What factors should you consider, and what should you be looking for when picking an RO system for your home? Find out below!

1. A Good Balance Of Cost & Quality

Reverse osmosis systems can be expensive, but that’s not always a bad thing. You get what you pay for, and that’s as true about RO systems as it is about anything else.

If you choose the cheapest reverse osmosis system on the market, you may end up with low-quality water, excess waste, or a reverse osmosis drinking water filter that stops working after just a few years. It’s worth spending a bit more to get better results.

Look for a brand that offers a good balance of both cost and quality. Consider your budget, and make sure you choose a system that will offer the performance you need without breaking the bank.

2. A Manufacturer With A Great Reputation

We recommend looking into reverse osmosis systems by manufacturers with a reputation for excellence, like Ising’s Culligan Water. We have been providing water filtration solutions for customers all throughout Livermore, CA, and the surrounding areas for years. You can trust our products to offer guaranteed performance.

3. The Proper Filtering Volume For Your Home

If you’re looking for a whole-home filtration system, you’ll need to consider the total capacity of your reverse osmosis system. Most manufacturers offer 50-gallon, 80-gallon, and 100-gallon systems. This refers to the total volume of water that the system can purify in a day.

If you’re just looking for an under-sink unit, this is not as big of a deal. However, you should still choose a reverse osmosis drinking water filter with a generous water storage tank capacity, as this will ensure that you always have access to clean, pure drinking water.

Follow These Tips To Choose The Right RO System For Your Home

Getting a reverse osmosis system is a great investment in your health and well-being. So don’t wait. Keep these tips in mind, and start exploring RO solutions from Ising’s Culligan Water today! Contact us online to get started, or give us a call at (925) 447-3717 if you have any questions.

How To Disinfect Your Well Water To Kill Bacteria: Your Step-By-Step Guide

It’s important to test your well water regularly to ensure it’s safe and healthy for consumption and use by your family. So if you test your well and you find that the well water become contaminated with dangerous or harmful bacteria,

1. Calculate The Volume Of Water In Your Well & Distribution System

First, you’ll need to estimate the volume of water that’s in your well, and in your water heater, pressure tank, and other systems of your home. If you’re not sure how much water your well contains, you can use this calculator to estimate the water volume in your system.

2. Add Household Bleach To Your Well To Kill Bacteria

You’ll want to add enough household bleach to reach 100 ppm (parts per million). The precise volume of water you’ll need to use depends on the size of your well, and the type of bleach you use. If you use a bleach that contains about   5-6% sodium hypochlorite bleach, you’ll need about 4.65 cups per 100 gallons of water in your system.

Pour the bleach on every part of your well, including the casing. Use a hose to pump well water back into the well, and rinse the entire well to make sure that the bleach is evenly distributed.

3. Wait Up To 24 Hours To Disinfect The System

Do not use the water in your well for at least 3 hours. 12-24 hours is preferable. During this time, the bleach will do its job by destroying harmful pathogens and bacteria in your well water. The longer you wait, the more thoroughly your well will be cleaned and sanitized.

4. Flush Your System To Remove Chlorine

As the final step, you’ll need to flush your well to remove chlorine from the system. Open up every tap and faucet in your home and property and begin pumping the water out of the well. If possible, water from outdoor faucets should be directed to areas without vegetation, such as gravel roads.

You must continue pumping the water out of your well until the chlorine odor dissipates. Then, you may turn off your taps, and allow your well water to re-accumulate. Then, test your water to ensure it’s free of bacteria.

Reverse Osmosis Can Help You Keep Your Well Water Safe & Healthy

If you have a well that’s been contaminated in the past, a reverse osmosis (RO) system may be a great investment for your home. With a reverse osmosis system from Ising’s Culligan Water, you can ensure that your water is always safe and healthy to drink. Visit our solution center or contact us at 925-206-3727 to get started.